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Established iPhone Developer Writes Personal Letter to Steve Jobs

Craig Hockenberry is an extremely talented Phone developer currently working at the Iconfactory. He’s been in Apple’s app store since it first launched, and is voicing a few of his thoughts regarding the app store in a heartfelt letter to Apple CEO Steve Jobs.

Below is the first section of Hockenberry’s letter to Apple. The entire letter can be found over at furbo.org.

Dear Steve,

As an iPhone developer who’s been in the App Store since its launch, I’m starting to see a trend that concerns me: developers are lowering prices to the lowest possible level in order to get favorable placement in iTunes. This proliferation of 99¢ “ringtone apps” is affecting our product development.

Unlike a lot of other developers, I’m not going to give you suggestions on what to do about this: you and your team are perfectly capable of dealing with it on your own terms. Rather, I’d like to give you some insight into how these ringtone apps are affecting my business.

Both of our products, Frenzic and Twitterrific, have been quite successful in the App Store. Frenzic is currently in What’s Hot and Twitterrific appears in both the Top Free and Top Paid Apps for 2008. We also won an ADA at this year’s WWDC. It hasn’t been easy, but we’ve learned what it takes to make a kick ass product for the iPhone.

The problem now is funding those products.

We have a lot of great ideas for iPhone applications. Unfortunately, we’re not working on the cooler (and more complex) ideas. Instead, we’re working on 99¢ titles that have a limited lifespan and broad appeal. Market conditions make ringtone apps most appealing.

Before commencing any new iPhone development, we look at the numbers and evaluate the risk of recouping our investment on a new project. Both developers and designers cost somewhere between $150-200 per hour. For a three man month project, let’s say that’s about $80K in development costs. To break even, we have to sell over 115K units. Not impossible with a good concept and few of weeks of prominent placement in iTunes….

The full letter can be found here.

Comments [67]

67 Comments to “Established iPhone Developer Writes Personal Letter to Steve Jobs”

jojo22 @ December 9th, 2008 at 11:11 am
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His pricing frustrations are definitely founded. He’s not the only one who feels trapped into making “one-time” or “novelty” applications by the App Store itself.

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Ryan @ December 9th, 2008 at 11:30 am
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Mr. Hockenberry clearly has a high opinion of his own work, but I’d argue Twitterrific isn’t anywhere near a “kick ass product” for the iPhone. Even if Twitterrific *were* a decent app, I think IconFactory has priced and marketed it incorrectly, and I fail to see how that is anyone else’s fault.

From his letter:

“We’re not afraid of competition. In fact, we welcome it as a way to improve our products and business. The thing we’re hoping for is a way to rise above the competition when we do our job well, not just when we have the lowest price.”

Ok, fair enough… but I don’t see or know of an example where this is the case. With regard to Twitterrific, it isn’t anywhere near the best Twitter client available for the iPhone, yet it is priced the highest! (I know his complaint isn’t just about their Twitterrific product, but I imagine it’s the basis for some of his concerns).

Maybe I’m just being dense, but I’m really not seeing the validity in his complaint. Is he suggesting there be less apps in the store so it’s not (in his words) a “fricken’ cat fight”? Hopefully someone can enlighten me…

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Herotia @ December 9th, 2008 at 11:54 am
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@Ryan: Actually, with regards and fairness to everyone, tweetsville is the best iPhone twitter client.

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Mark @ December 9th, 2008 at 12:25 pm
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I think he knows what he’s talking about, he works at Iconfactory and clearly has some serious connections. He obviously has developed successful applications, as he mentions, and knows the process.

@Ryan: I just don’t know how much more experienced than this it gets man. I mean, unless they’ve helped write the iPhone SDK or API’s then how averse can they really be with Cocao touch or Apple’s languages?

It makes sense to me that this guy’s opinions should be taken seriously. Apple should listen.

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Ryan @ December 9th, 2008 at 12:35 pm
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You won’t get an argument from me about his being a top Mac developer; I completely agree (I still don’t like the Twitterrific iPhone app however).

I’m just not getting his argument in this case.

Maybe he doesn’t want there to be a top sellers list at all? Perhaps a more granular shopping experience than a few simple “top” lists? I’m not sure.

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yuryu45 @ December 9th, 2008 at 12:37 pm
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I’ve been saying for a while that the app store is highly unorganized. Plus, every writer on this site has called the app store a “high-end application boutique” that Apples runs by picking and choosing applications that will reside in the store. They need to seriously reorganize this shit.

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jASON bOURNE @ December 9th, 2008 at 8:44 pm
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Wow, seems there really IS a LOT of money to be made out there.

jess
http://www.Privacy-Center.net

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Prem @ December 9th, 2008 at 8:45 pm
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SDK for windows.. please

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Craig Hockenberry @ December 9th, 2008 at 8:48 pm
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@Ryan It doesn’t matter what you think about our apps. This is not an article on how popular our apps are–this is an article that is intended to help Apple management improve their current policies in the App Store.

The only reason I included that information about the popularity of our apps is so that said management would know that I have some experience in the matter.

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Ryan @ December 9th, 2008 at 9:27 pm
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Hi Craig,

I’m all for improving policies in the App Store, I just wasn’t sure what an appropriate improvement would be based on the concerns you voiced.

I know you weren’t suggesting a specific change for Apple to implement, but I’m curious if you could share a general concept of how you think the featured/top products are showcased might be enhanced. Would you be in favor of weighting the top seller list, as Gruber suggests? Or eliminating the top sellers list altogether?

If Apple were to attempt to address this, how would they differentiate between companies with more nefarious price fixing motives (as a way to game the system), versus companies with a legitimate development cost advantage?

Ok, sorry for all the questions… would love to hear more from you on this.

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dstryr @ December 9th, 2008 at 8:50 pm
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I think a ‘novelty’ section would be a great solution, not only to distinguish those apps from others with loftier ambitions, but also because sometimes I do feel like searching for some silly little app for no reason other than it’s novelty value, I’d often like to peruse those apps minus the ’serious’ ones.

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Aviv @ December 9th, 2008 at 8:57 pm
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Paul @ December 9th, 2008 at 9:03 pm
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@Aviv: That’s DEFINITELY a step in the right direction.

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bob @ December 9th, 2008 at 9:05 pm
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Bullshit! Total utter bullshit! In fact there are many free apps I would gladly pay 5 bucks for. But the suckers put it up for free banking on ad dollars.

If you really think your little bullshit risk analysis means anything, think about the risk analysis that went into the iphone. A huge investment.

No, you dont deserve more than 99 cents because you dont have what it takes to get more than that.

Its called a fucking imagination.

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Mitch @ December 10th, 2008 at 4:26 pm
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Hey Bob. You’re a fucking idiot.

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jojo22 @ December 9th, 2008 at 9:09 pm
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How can what Craig H. (the iPhone developer) is saying about pricing per development costs be ignored? These are substantial numbers people. Who other than seriously established firms can afford to do this? NOBODY ?!?!?!

Apple needs to listen to the dev community. It’s really that simple.

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Stephen Waits @ December 9th, 2008 at 9:18 pm
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Please..

It’s a market. If people are buying (i.e. “demand”) crapware $0.99 apps, developers are going to develop (i.e. “supply”) sad crapware $0.99 apps.

The whole letter can be translated to a few words: WAHHHH WWAAAHHHH!!

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Ilgaz @ December 10th, 2008 at 1:06 pm
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You don’t even use a Mac do you? Or a recent switcher?

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Stephen Waits @ December 11th, 2008 at 7:51 am
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I have used a Mac exclusively, at home, for years (a mini and a MBP). Yet I’m still not blinded enough by the Cult of Mac to prevent me from knowing a whiner when I see one.

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irthis @ December 9th, 2008 at 9:19 pm
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Great letter that raises some valid points. I think instead of basing the top 100 paid apps on total downloads it should be done based on revenue. So if a $5 app is downloaded 30 times it will be higher on the rankings than a $1 app downloaded 100 times. No, this won’t fix all the problems but it is an easy step in the right direction.

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Mark H. @ December 9th, 2008 at 9:37 pm
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Can someone explain to me how he got the $80k/3-man-month breaks down in terms of dollars per hour per developer?

He says “Both developers and designers cost somewhere between $150-200 per hour.” but that certainly can’t mean EACH person gets paid that much, can it?!

Thanks,
Mark

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Eric S. @ December 9th, 2008 at 10:01 pm
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2000 hours in a working year (or man-year, if you will) / 12 = 167 man-hours per month. 167h/m * 3 months * $150/hr = $75k, using the lowest-end figures. It could be one guy working 2 hours a day for a year, three people for a month, or ninety people for a day – you just base the number off of the number of billed/salaried hours in the three-month period.

$150-200/hr is not an unusual rate for a good developer, though you can see rates nowhere near that in both directions regardless of quality.

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Troy @ December 9th, 2008 at 10:23 pm
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When you load up a person with benefits, rent, power, computers, etc. it can easily add up to 150/hr … all of that stuff has to be paid for somehow.

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me-here @ December 10th, 2008 at 2:42 am
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You must live in a place where cost of living and salaries are way higher than where I do (the latter for sure) because here in North Italy a (good/decent) developer takes something like one third of what you get/spend per hour; and we have to pay our rent with that money, too, with no benefits to be seen at all.
Time to buy that damn Apple certificate and start spitting out crap ware for the masses!

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me @ December 12th, 2008 at 3:05 pm
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You missed a few costs. Not only does the cost of an employee include that employees salary, it also includes the rent for the office, lights, heating, internet, telephone, employeer paid taxes, any benefits that the employee gets that cost the employeer money, etc. Once you start adding all of that up it can reach $150-200/hr per person even if the person is being paid much less.

And for the others out there, the guys point is not that his apps are not selling, at least as I read it, his point was that there is a war of the $0.99 apps more than quality apps. Quality apps are what will make the store do well from apples perspective. From a developers perspective, its silly to pour a lot of time and front a lot of money to develop a quality app that will end up low on the list because its price is above the $0.99 prices that appear at the top of most lists. I dont use the itunes stuff, apple app store or anything else that way so I dont know about the ordering, but it seems that he made a clear point about that in the excerpt given that started this thread.

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Davide @ December 10th, 2008 at 2:57 am
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From a fellow Italian developer: it’s no mistery that everyone is way underpaid in Italy, developers are no exception. CH’s example are obviously examples of excellency, we’re talking about iconfactory, one of the best mac software houses down there. I don’t see 150$/h as too much for a objective-c ninja, and there’s no doubt it’s code ninjas we’re talking about here.
If one doesn’t get why an iconfactory coder/UI designer should be paid that much, well, get their apps and give it a look; if still you don’t get it, I guess you won’t ever get 150$/h after all :)
And please peopl,e note that these folks at iconfactory are paid 150$/h to make *the opposite* of crapware. They’re very good, that’s why they’re well paid.
No offense intended :)
Davide

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John Bender @ December 12th, 2008 at 2:30 pm
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I’m a .NET consultant in new york and we bill out at $165 and hour. Software developer’s can get paid pretty well.

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Jon @ December 9th, 2008 at 9:40 pm
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If he wants to sell his product for more than $0.99 why doesn’t he try doing some marketing. The app store is a store, not his freaking marketing department. It’s simply selling him shelf space. Does Walmart convince customers one product’s better than another? No, it just throws them all on the shelf side by side and lets customers sort through the mess, just like the app store. If he wants to sell his product it’s his responsibility to build demand for it before it ever hits the app store. If he can’t convince customers to buy why should Apple???

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Bill @ December 10th, 2008 at 5:39 am
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Not strictly true. People pay for placement on the shelves at Wal-Mart and nearly every other b&m store.

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me @ December 12th, 2008 at 3:10 pm
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If it were truely side by side then his comments about how the list starts with $0.99 and the further down you go the higher the price, thus he isnt even at the same level. And walmart does position products for selling them, they and most other retail stores do this. Take a walk down the cereal isle at your local grocery, notice that at eye level are the name brand products and the generics are way lower? Walmart and others do the same type of things, by placing hot selling items at end caps of the shelves, by placing them at eye level instead of lower, by putting that big yellow smiley around some products, etc.

Dont believe for a moment that they just randomly place the stuff and give the comsumer a fair side by side comparison, walmart especially tracks purchases, who buys what, and when they do what else they buy, why they place pretzels near the lined paper, because they know that more people who buy notebook paper also buy pretzels (real example from the real database walmart has, over a decade ago their database for just what products sold together and where they were located in teh store was over 13TB, which back then was an insane size).

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michael @ December 9th, 2008 at 9:49 pm
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jon (above) makes a good point

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Sanjay Madhavan @ December 9th, 2008 at 10:16 pm
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I have to agree with craig. The reason many apps are in the top sellers category are because they are cheap or free.

The App store should have a Try Before you buy section where anybody can download and use the app for a week and after which it uninstalls itself or you pay for it and you keep it.

That would be a huge incentive for folks to actually download and use the more expensive apps and potentially pay for them if they found them useful. If folks buy an app they could be encouraged to rate the app and if they choose to let the app expire they could be encouraged to give the reason why they did NOT buy the app. Those ratings would be much more useful than the current feedback mechanism which is going to be pretty much all negative since the user has chosen to uninstall the app.

It is an altogether other topic that for me some of the best apps/utilities out there are not even on the Appstore but are on Cydia. (my favorites: Intelliscreen, Quickgold, Categories, SBSettings)

/sanjay

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MobileMe @ December 9th, 2008 at 10:19 pm
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This guy’s argument is invalid. App Store will “sell” a billion apps either before this year ends or early next year. iTunes has sold over 5 billion songs since its inception at .99c a track.
If an app is worth $9.99 and people perceive it to be worth that much people will buy it. The problem currently is that most apps are not worth what the developers are asking for.
I do agree with him that maybe Apple aught to show more than just screen dumps, although I personally hate trials, this might help people make better decisions as to whether a certain apps is worth $? or not.
Developers need to better market their products like music companies market their artists and artists’ work. Apple cannot do this for you.

I think a correct strategy is to have products in all price points, free, entry/$0.99, mid and higher. Free and entry – to market your work and company. Mid to differentiate your work by offering better than average products and higher – taking full advantage of the platform and setting yourself above the rest.

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Troy @ December 9th, 2008 at 10:21 pm
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Why cant I sort by user rating? That’s all I want … in each category the simple ability to sort by user rating. Amazon allows it for Pete’s sake. I think that would solve some of the problems.

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Michael Long @ December 9th, 2008 at 10:49 pm
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Take a page from YouTube and let them sort by a time period. Then you’d have Most Popular Today, Most Popular This Week. Most Popular All Time.

That would allow you to see the “hot” items as well as the most consistent sellers.

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dave @ December 9th, 2008 at 10:25 pm
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$200/hour? 400K a year? Please, sign me up.

Maybe instead of outsourcing that work, hire someone fulltime for say 100K.

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Ilgaz @ December 10th, 2008 at 1:07 pm
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Yes, companies should outsource their development. We see some great results in another OS named Windows and Windows Mobile.
heh.

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John Bender @ December 12th, 2008 at 2:33 pm
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I’ve worked with offshore consultants, and I haven’t been very impressed.

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J. Acai @ December 9th, 2008 at 11:24 pm
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Wooh $150-200/hour for iPhone developers! I don’t believe this.

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Zwinglow @ December 9th, 2008 at 11:54 pm
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And if you are hiring iPhoney developers for that much…..it shouldn’t take more than a month to get a good, decent app out the door and in the store. It’s not like you are developing an OS.

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Jesse Farmer @ December 9th, 2008 at 11:54 pm
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People just haven’t found a good way or marketing applications outside the app store itself, yet. Since the app store is primarily a distribution (rather than marketing) channel, it’s only natural for the prices to fall to zero.

In response to this letter I wrote about just this phenomenon, here: http://20bits.com/articles/the-099-app-store/

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r3dracer @ December 10th, 2008 at 12:52 am
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Point well taken. As an iPhone user I would WILLINGLY pay for a quality product but most of the 10k apps are very niche (local weather, OK) or duplicates (todo to death) or not really leveraging the iPhone potential. The others are great! Steve, please note!!!

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RichMurrills @ December 10th, 2008 at 3:11 am
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My biggest gripe with the App Store is the lack of a try-before-you-buy facility. Apart from encouraging people to download more expensive apps if they find them useful, it would also allow users to try a variety of similar apps so they can make an informed decision as to which they prefer, in turn encouraging developers to raise their game and provide better written, more feature-laden apps.

There’s so much dross out there on the app store that any mechanism to help avoid paying for a buggy, poorly written piece of software would be welcome – yes there are ratings but these are never completely reliable, and of course they are very subjective – people expect and demand different things in their apps.

‘Lite’ apps go some way to addressing this issue but IMHO it would be more useful to be able to try out a full version with all the features for a week and then make a decision as to whether or not to part with hard-earned cash.

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Spencer Lavery @ December 10th, 2008 at 4:05 am
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Hold on… why are you even relying on the iTunes store to market your product for you in the first place?

The iTunes store certainly showcases songs but I don’t see record companies giving up on TV spots, magazine ads, radio interviews, good ol’ PR, viral marketing, etc.

If you want to sell more of your apps, then you should market your product more, it’s not Apple’s responsibility. They make their cut no matter which app they sell.

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Jesse Farmer @ December 10th, 2008 at 9:57 am
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Exactly. The App Store solves a distribution problem, not a marketing problem.

Find places outside the app store to promote your app and drive people too the App Store. Don’t be at the mercy of Apple’s placement.

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Ged Maheux @ December 14th, 2008 at 10:07 am
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Spencer, yes by all means let’s compare the advertising and marketing budgets of major record labels to that of a small, 10 person company who makes icons and a few pieces of software for a living. The sheer notion of this is ridiculous.

I am one of the founding members of the Iconfactory and over our 14+ years in business we’ve marketed MANY applications. Marketing in traditional media outlets is prohibitively expensive and relatively ineffective. When you are forced to shift the price of your product to .99 and have no profit margin what-so-ever, saying “Make it up in volume” by marketing is a huge gamble.

Some apps that are crap get lucky like iBeer which I consider to be the most “ring tone-y” app in the entire store. It’s practically useless and yet there it sits in the top 10 selling thousands of copies a day. So you tell me, should we spend our time, effort and money making the next highly useful utility like Twitterrific for Twitter or spend a few days/weeks making iBeer 2?

Something needs to give.

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G @ December 10th, 2008 at 5:58 am
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im with people who think hes whining, but I think hes a genius at the same time. I mean he wrote an open letter to Steve Jobs, mentioned his apps several times and got it posted on the internet. yay for free advertising.

But I totally agree with Spencer Lavery.

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Sam @ December 10th, 2008 at 6:33 am
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I’m an iPhone dev with a top 100 app in the app store.

One of the problems is that developers are simply overcharging right now. There is a shortage of good devs so they are charging 150/hour, which is what really makes building a profitable app impossible. It’s not the store’s fault. At the numbers quoted about, do iPhone devs think that our coding is really worth $240,000 a year? Really?

Once more devs learn how to code for the iPhone, and developing countries start putting downward price pressure on US developers, then we’ll see some really great apps made for 20-30K, not 200-300k.

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Sunstock @ December 10th, 2008 at 6:56 am
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Does he want some cheese & crackers with that whine?

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Ray @ December 10th, 2008 at 8:13 am
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In some ways I agree, in some ways I don’t. I made my first app on the side in about 2-3 weeks for $0, and it made me over $200k in the first two months. For that reason, I can’t say anything bad about the app store, it’s an absolute god send for individual developers, especially ones who just do this on the side.

The problem I’m having, and how I relate with this developer, is for individual developers, they can just spend their time, put up a $.99 app, and if it sells, then good, if not, no biggie. For companies, they take losses if they can’t meet their numbers. So if a company produces an app, gets it listed, but it’s listed very low on the list on it’s first day because there were 10 dial my mom apps that were released that day and pushed it down so it got very little visibility. Unless that app gets into one of the featured sections in the app store, it doesn’t have a chance of succeeding. No amount of advertising will help your app sales, your success is all the in the hands of the app store. Another problem is that since we all have to go through Apple’s approval, there is no guarantee we’ll even be listed, so if a company were to spend 20K developing an app and it got shot down, they would have wasted all that time and money. I have some brilliant ideas for apps right now that I want to do, but they’ll require some money and I’m afraid of investing in them considering there could be a chance they don’t get approved.

Overall my experience with the app store has been amazing so far, but I can understand the frustration of others. This is a new marketplace and I’m sure it will perfect itself over time.

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Trent @ December 10th, 2008 at 8:42 am
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Ray, it’s not necessarily, true that advertising will not help. Personally speaking, most of the apps I’ve paid for on the app store have been advertised and reviewed on a website such as Gizmodo.

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Dan Atkinson @ December 10th, 2008 at 8:25 am
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Why not just lower prices, to make it appeal to more users, rather than have a great app and put a huge price tag on it.

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Jesse Farmer @ December 10th, 2008 at 10:48 am
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Because it’s revenue you care about, not volume.

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Tom @ December 10th, 2008 at 9:28 am
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Craig Hockenberry does not know how to run a business and he is searching for mercy. Call the government to bail you out sucker!

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Matt @ December 10th, 2008 at 11:07 am
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Craig, I can see your concern. Apple definitely has ways to improve the situation, but sheesh, if you have an awesome idea for an app, just do it. Risk it. Word gets around; people will buy it if they think it seems worth it. You may not be able to game the system and make a ton of money real fast and immediately recoup the development cost, but you’ll be better off in the long run. If the crap rises to the top in the Featured sections and Top 25 sections or whatever, people will start realizing that they have to look deeper to find the good stuff. Then everybody will start caring more. Finding a good app will be even more satisfying because it wasn’t spoon-fed to you. I’m rambling, I know.

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Robert DeFranco @ December 10th, 2008 at 11:49 am
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What a cry baby!

Here is my Open Letter to Craig

http://www.211me.com/corp/blog/index.php/2008/12/10/an-open-letter-to-craig-hockenberry/

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Ilgaz @ December 10th, 2008 at 1:10 pm
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Everyone using Mac, especially technical users has some sort of clue who Craig Hockenberry is and his record of professional developer. The company itself is famous for designing the entire iconset of Windows XP and several high end, multi (b)million projects.
May I ask who the hell are you to write that letter to him? If you are looking for a job at Apple, it is not the way to go. They don’t like your type too.

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Eli @ December 10th, 2008 at 2:16 pm
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I like the fanboy niche you’ve carved out here. Not Apple, not the iPhone, but a developer whining about getting into the shallow end of the programming pool.

Phone and mobile apps have always been $1-10. People generally just aren’t willing to pay more than that. If your business model is built entirely on writing iPhone programs and getting paid the same as if you were writing a desktop program, you’re not going to do so well. Most of The Iconfactory’s programs have been overpriced for what they do. I’m not particularly sad to see that they’re finally facing some competition.

A lot of iPhone programs are written by hobbyists and people who can afford to spend some time on a program without being paid $150 an hour. This gives them a distinct advantage that I think the deserve.

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Robert DeFranco @ December 10th, 2008 at 3:20 pm
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Yes, Craig has done some impressive work, very impressive. His open letter to Apple is probably less serious than it is being taken. Hence my open letter to him, which as far from serious as you can get.

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Tom @ December 12th, 2008 at 1:28 pm
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Nobody underestimate his professionalism. But crying online is lame. Why humble?

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Christopher Pratt @ December 10th, 2008 at 3:02 pm
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I can definitely see the developers point. Personally, I can count the number of iPhone apps I’ve paid over $.99 for on one hand, and probably have a few fingers left over. More to the point I doubt I’ve paid for more than 10 apps in total, filling 5 home screens full with mostly free apps.

There’s a definitely barrier to development here, and I agree with the developer’s rationale that it’s not being able to play with the app before laying down cold hard cash that’s the root of the problem. On my Mac, I can try any software before I buy it, and that has been a saving grace more than once. There’s a fair amount of crap out there that people wrap up with a tidy bow and sell as the second coming of Christ.

Why hasn’t apple introduced a trial system to the app store? They have a similar model already in place with iTunes movie rentals. Can’t we “check out” apps and have them disable themselves in iTunes after a defined period of time unless you fork up some dough. I’ll spend money on a good app (actually just purchased Air Mouse which costs $6.99 and hasn’t invoked buyers remorse), but I need it to be a good app.

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samab @ December 10th, 2008 at 4:52 pm
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This is the wii mini-games vs. epic scale ps3 games with a $20 million budget.

Guess what — the wii mini games won. Even the most die-hard game studios are spending money on developing these mini games.

Nobody put a gun on these game studios to stop them from spending $20 million developing a epic scale game.

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Sanderson Smith @ December 10th, 2008 at 10:05 pm
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Craig sounds like a record label executive complaining about file dowloads killing CD sales. Adapt to the market! Its come full circle back to the shareware days of the early 90’s. Offer a stripped free version to get the app out to try, then charge a fair price for it. And don’t rely on the app store to get your app noticed. Post a video or two on youtube to show it off. A buck is OK for a disposable app if I don’t like it, but I won’t give up my latte for a garbage app.

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cover letter samples @ December 11th, 2008 at 9:26 am
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Everyone using Mac, especially technical users has some sort of clue who Craig Hockenberry is and his record of professional developer.

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iPhone Dev Monkey @ December 12th, 2008 at 3:07 pm
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I agree with Craig to a degree. But, I also don’t equate iPhone applications at the same level as an application designed for laptops, or even other mobile platforms. The restrictions on developers with regards to the sandbox the apps run in really just make it so that we can build the same applications you would build in Flash. Not being able to access background processes, or extend the functionality of the actual phone like what can be done with other mobile platforms such as Blackberry, Symbian and Android for example. I am not discounting the capabilities of the iPhone developers, but making a point about the complexity of the applications, it is just different than building apps on these other platforms. We are so restricted it is difficult to build anything of use, so you end up with a bunch of duplicate applications with the same functionality.

We build applications for all mobile platforms and compared to what is available from RIM for example, building iPhone apps has been like playing with Legos while the other kids are building robots. You can only build so many different variations of Tetris before you begin to question the business model of focusing only on iPhone apps. I am optimistic though, I think Apple will come around and give us the tools we need to really make the platform shine, but waiting for them to open things up a bit more is going to be painful.

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iPhone Application Developer @ January 30th, 2009 at 4:50 pm
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Well I’m not a “TOP” Mac developer, but at least I know how to get the job done, and I always do :)

Sam
iPhone Application Developer

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Will @ February 2nd, 2010 at 8:41 am
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Hopefully I can be of assistance to current and up and coming developers.

I specialise in the recruitment of iPhone developers and I am a great contact to have if you’re a developer. I have access to some of the best App development companies and I am passionate about what I do!

Drop me an Email: wharford@keypeople.co.uk
Connect with me on LinkedIn, http://uk.linkedin.com/in/wharford (I accept all requests)
Or call me 00441727 817641

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