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Apple’s Plans Should Be Clear: High-End iPhones and Global Positioning

As the market reels from Apple’s announcements in their Q1 financial earnings call, a clear distinction between Apple’s current position, and where they should be headed with the iPhone product line is made even more apparent.

big_iphoneWe already know that Apple doesn’t like to dabble in cheap products. Whether it be a sub-$500 netbook (cheap ultra portable PC), or the rather silly idea of an iPhone nano, Apple is not here to make cheap products. They are here to innovate, push technology forward and deliver the best user experiences, as COO Tim Cook says himself.

Even though Apple has been known for dismissing product categories altogether before stepping in and “re-inventing” them, this doesn’t seem to be the case with either of the products Apple fans seem to be lusting over. In regards to the iPhone nano and a cheap netbook, Apple is opting to stay away. They have reiterated their stance on the netbook market, and find no value in offering cheaper mobile devices like an iPhone nano. In our book, this is good.

As we’ve explained before, a netbook or tablet-like device would be aimed at a niche group of people who are lusting over it, or want something similar. As far as a smaller notebook with cramped innards and lower than optimal input methods (small screens, tiny keyboards), Apple has never been too keen on developing a poor user experience. Spend 15 minutes looking at someone trying to get some work done on a netbook and you’ll see what Apple is referring to.

While some may argue that there is a grey area between the Macbook Air and the iPhone where an ultra portable device may be presented, how would the device appeal to the masses? Reiterating what seems to be misunderstood throughout the industry by many. Until multi-touch technology matures, don’t expect to see it on a bigger device, a tablet or anything directly from Apple. There are still global inconsistencies with Apple’s UI, most notably being copy-and-paste, and until that is addressed, the idea of a bigger device using the same operating system (sans copy-and-paste) is outlandish.

However, regardless of whether or not Apple offers us copy-and-paste, expect the iPhone product lineup to grow in diversification. The 8GB iPhone will become less expensive and reside at the bottom end of the lineup, while they expand the top line into more expensive models. Higher end iPhones would have bigger screens, more memory, larger capacity batteries and make for an even better user experience than what’s out there today.

In conjunction with expanding its iPhone lineup, aggressively positioning the iPhone across global markets should remain at the top of Apple’s priority list. This is where Apple’s initiatives should remain with innovation. 2009 will be a tough year for the economy and we shouldn’t necessarily expect a new product category out of Apple. Instead, the company should remain focused on its fundamentals and getting those iPhone sales back up. Inevitably, the iPhone won’t sell this rapidly forever, but having a product family that consumers can’t avoid may help fill that gap.

Comments [10]

10 Comments to “Apple’s Plans Should Be Clear: High-End iPhones and Global Positioning”

Elvin @ January 22nd, 2009 at 11:01 am
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First of all. I would buy an iPhone nano. Second of all. I would but an Apple netbook. But I am an Apple craved lunatic… So, I don’t count.

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Aviv @ January 22nd, 2009 at 11:10 am
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@Elvin: I probably wouldn’t buy either :D LOL But I would buy a bigger, better, faster iPhone.

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GB3 @ January 22nd, 2009 at 11:16 am
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I don’t know about a completely touch tablet anyways. Productivity is just weird because it would be touch. That would just be weird. If it were mote than $350 it would be really weird.

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jojo22 @ January 22nd, 2009 at 11:51 am
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A smaller iPhone would be a really awful product. Only high school chicks would buy that device.

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Ryan @ January 22nd, 2009 at 12:05 pm
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Thank you for correctly stating the functionality as “copy-and-paste” instead of the less correct “cut-and-paste”. This has been bugging me with many other sites. The copy is what we’re all dying for; cut would be gravy.

Minor details I know…

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Aviv @ January 22nd, 2009 at 12:57 pm
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@Ryan: I like your style.

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Michael @ January 22nd, 2009 at 1:02 pm
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Well I’m not dying for copy&paste, but I do wish Apple would add and enhance data detectors to cocoa touch. This alone would solve most people’s needs.

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nico @ January 22nd, 2009 at 1:29 pm
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@Michael: Are you building an app that would need this? If so, what in gods name could you need this for?

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shimon @ January 22nd, 2009 at 10:04 pm
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I like the firm point on NO iphone nano. I think it would be a really horrible product, not to mention so niche and so cheap. I just got worried when it seemed like Apple was focusing so much effort on that. I’m glad they aren’t.

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John Koivukangas @ January 26th, 2009 at 2:16 pm
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Thank you for the latest in a recent series of down-to-earth guestimates of Apple strategy. As a medical doctor, I would need an iPhone (cell, WiMax, touch screen etc.) with enough memory and GPU to handle not only phone, PDA and internet functions, but actual hospital information spread over the many huge databases, integrated in a revolutionary way. Of course, a good GUI has been missing. Enter: Onesys Navigator, which I helped into this world, recently released here in the US. Most IT companies are run by individuals with, fortunately, no immediate and personal health concerns and health care delivery experiences. This means that hospitals are the last things on their minds. Maybe Apple will finally provide us with what is needed: a real-world mobile device for the health care vertical market. It is ready. There would be lots of partners and 700,000 physicians in the US alone. So power to the high-end iPhone and all the best from one innovator to another!

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